Category Archives: David & Michael Barry

The NY Daily News: Staten Island wants to be the new Brooklyn

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Katherine Clarke at the NY Daily News reports on Staten Island development and  Ironstate Development Company.

An island that boomed with exiles who followed the Dodgers out of the borough is now poised for a new renaissance as investors and developers pour $1 billion into the North Shore in hopes of striking Brooklyn-style gold.

Sure, it’s long been considered the city’s least hip enclave, but these boosters believe it can finally be transformed into the borough’s answer to booming Long Island City or even Jersey City, with glassy high-rises geared toward young professionals.

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Developers are already building with an eye toward the hipster set that jump-started the gentrification of Williamsburg and Bushwick — neighborhoods that, in some ways, are more far flung for some than the island at the other end of the ferry.

Ironstate Development, the real estate giant behind a string of high-rises on the New Jersey waterfront, is set to launch 571 new luxe apartments in the Stapleton area this fall, with studios, one-bedroom and two-bedroom homes starting at $1,600 a month.

The launch is just the first phase of a project, dubbed URL Staten Island, short for “Urban Ready Life,” which is ultimately slated to include 900 apartments with top-of-the-line amenities and a string of cute, boutique retail spots geared at twentysomethings.

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“Kids will no longer have to feel like they’re settling if they want to stay on Staten Island,” said David Barry of Ironstate. “They can stay where they are and still get what they want.”

It’s about time.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE.


Ironstate Development Named Top NJ Developer

Ironstate Development Company tops The Real Deal’s list of top New Jersey developers.

BY C. J. Hughes

Hudson County, which includes urban areas like Jersey City, Hoboken and Weehawken, is radiating cool these days, with its hip restaurants, arts scene and proximity to New York City. That vibe, along with rents often around 50 percent of Manhattan’s and 20 percent cheaper than those in Brooklyn, is making it one of the hottest residential destinations in the tri-state area, its supporters say.

“It’s a terrific location for somebody who wants affordability,” said Jeffrey Kanne, the chief executive of National Real Estate Advisors, which has teamed with Kushner Real Estate Group to build Journal Squared,
a three-phase, 1,800-unit colossus in
Jersey City.

Using our own research and data from CoStar Group and BuzzBuzzHome,

The Real Deal ranked the top developers by number of units that hit the market in 2014 and 2015, as well as those that will come online by the end of 2017. When firms partnered on projects, TRD allocated the full number of units to each of them.

1. Ironstate Development Company

Claiming the top spot is a Hoboken-based firm with deep roots in the area, Ironstate Development Company, with 3,354 units. A huge chunk of that total is made up by URL (Urban Ready Living) Harborside, an amenity-laden rental complex in Jersey City with a total of about 2,300 units. Its first phase, which will open in mid-2016, will consist of 763 apartments in a massive 69-story tower.

Harborside, which is being developed in partnership with Mack-Cali Realty Corporation, will feature a gym and even an urban farm with beehives. Its lobby cafe, which is expected to be operated by New York chain Coffeed, will be open to the public and “become a social hub for the neighborhood,” said Michael Barry, an Ironstate executive.

The company is also the developer — with Panepinto Properties (see #10) — behind the luxury residences 50, 70 and 90 Columbus in Jersey City.


Staten Island’s Turning Point?

A view of URL Staten Island, a new residential and retail complex rising in the Stapleton neighborhood, from the Stapleton platform of the Staten Island Railway. URL overlooks Upper New York Bay. Credit Edwin J. Torres for The New York Times

A view of URL Staten Island, a new residential and retail complex rising in the Stapleton neighborhood, from the Stapleton platform of the Staten Island Railway. URL overlooks Upper New York Bay. Credit Edwin J. Torres for The New York Times

C.J. Hughes at The New York Times features Ironstate Development in a report about the revitalization of Staten Island. 

A wide bay may separate Staten Island from the rest of the city. But in terms of real estate, differences between the borough and other enclaves seem to be lifting like a morning fog.

New rentals and condominiums, some with perks like a pet spa or rooftop beehives, are rewriting the island’s skyline. Big-city cool is popping up in a place not always noted for it: Small-batch espresso will soon flow at a coffee shop; a jug band played kazoos at a recently opened brewery; and stores selling brand-name skinny-leg pants are on their way. And a fresh crop of renters and buyers, unable to afford pricier precincts and unfazed by stereotypes about how the place can seem insular, bland or run-down, are setting sail for the island.

 Rising on a desolate stretch of waterfront is URL Staten Island, short for “Urban Ready Life,” a $250 million mixed-use project with about 900 rental apartments in a series of buildings resembling factories, with bands of windows and flat roofs, the better to house bee hives.

The first phase, with 571 studios, one-bedrooms and two-bedrooms, will open this fall. Interiors will feature stone counters and bamboo floors, plus stacked washers and dryers. Studios will likely start around $1,600 a month, and two-bedrooms at $2,800, said David Barry, the president of Ironstate Development, the developer.

The site will contain 35,000 square feet of retail space, more than half of which is now leased. Among the future tenants are a pizzeria, a store dedicated to specialty olive oils and Lola Star, a Coney Island clothing shop that is soon to open a branch in that other rising outpost, the Rockaways. Coffeed, a chain that brewed its first cup in Long Island City, Queens, will also be there.

National chain stores, such as those that dot Staten Island’s strip malls, are not welcome at URL. “This place has its own special character,” Mr. Barry said. “The stores should reflect that.”

URL will also have a 5,000-square-foot plot planted with vegetables that can be purchased from an on-site farm stand. Or, for a fee, residents will be able to request that its kale, spinach, rainbow chard and mizuna be prepared by a chef who will do double duty as the head farmer, said Mr. Barry, who was sifting through résumés for the post as he spoke.

READ FULL ARTICLE AT THE NEW YORK TIMES


Ironstate expanding its development focus to Connecticut, Staten Island

2015-03-09_11-30-35Joshua Burd at NJ BIZ reports on the expansion of Ironstate Developmentinto Staten Island and Connecticut.

After decades spent building a vast multifamily portfolio around New Jersey’s Gold Coast and then New York City, Ironstate Development is adding a new location to its list of target markets: Stamford, Connecticut.

The well-respected Hoboken-based firm is preparing to start construction on a 672-unit, mixed-use project in that city, which sits about 40 miles from Manhattan and is connected by a busy Metro-North rail station. Working in a joint venture with The Rich Co., a local developer, Ironstate said it expects to begin site work next month and deliver the first phase of 194 units by around fall 2016.

FULL ARTICLE


One Man’s Bold Quest to Lure Cool New Yorkers to the City’s Least-Hip Borough

 

fast company logo

 

CAN A NEW $150 MILLION DEVELOPMENT TURN STATEN ISLAND INTO A GENUINE RESIDENTIAL DESTINATION? HMM.

BY CAITLIN MOSCATELLO

Staten Island is one of New York’s five boroughs, but it seems like another world. Nobody goes there except for tourists who want to ride the free ferry and residents commuting home. The cool kids across the river have long laughed at the perennially unhip borough, treating it–if they ever think about it at all–like some loud, embarrassing cousin who you pray doesn’t show up at your birthday party and hit on your Warby Parker-wearing friends. The stereotypes can be ruthless: Mob Wives, tanning, SHOTS! SHOTS! SHOTS!, hair gel. Three members of the Jersey Shore cast were actually Staten Islanders. But here’s the thing: how many smug New Yorkers who mock that land on the other side of the ferry have actually spent any time there? What if Staten Island secretly has the potential to be…kind of cool?

FC BarryThat’s what David Barry is banking on, anyway. The 48-year-old co-president of real estate development company Ironstate is investing $150 million in a new residential project being built along the North Shore of Staten Island, and he’s specifically targeting the sort of cosmopolitan millennials who typically head directly to the sexier parts of Brooklyn. The project, set to open in fall 2015, is the first of Ironstate’s Urban Ready Living (URL) developments, which have been created with the help of Dutch design firm Concrete. The 571 initial units, with another 300-plus scheduled for phase two of construction, will be affordable–at least by New York standards, where the median price for an apartment tops $3,100 a month, according to data from the real estate research firm REIS. Pricing for the project isn’t finalized yet, but Barry says that 400-square-foot studios will start around $1,600, 550-square-foot one-bedrooms around $2,000, and 700-square-foot two-bedrooms around $2,400. That’s roughly $45 per square foot. Compare that to Williamsburg, Brooklyn–still the epicenter of NYC hipness–where studio apartments now cost an average of $2,632 a month, per the latest Brooklyn Rental Market Report.

FULL ARTICLE


A New Jersey: Jersey City Surge

DN Cover JPEGDavid Barry and Ironstate Development are featured in today’s New York Daily News report on Jersey City development. Check out mentions of  URL Harborside, 18 Park, and 225 Grand.

Read the full article HERE.


Groundbreaking held for 69-story all-inclusive waterfront development in Jersey City

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via Michaelangelo Conte/ NJ.com

A groundbreaking was held yesterday for a 69-story, 763-rental unit tower on Jersey City’s waterfront which has been described by a developer as “a neighborhood in a building.”

“It will be a vertical neighborhood,’’ said David Barry, president of Ironstate Development, which is undertaking the project with Mack-Cali Realty.

URL (Urban Ready Living) Harborside apartment building will be part of Mack-Cali’s Harborside Plaza and is the first of three planned high-rise apartments.

In the Atrium at Harborside 3, Mack-Cali President and CEO Mitchell E. Hersh spoke of the $291 million tower, saying, “We believe there is strong demand for a live-work-play environment that offers a true sense of community, all in an amenity-rich, transit-oriented location.’’

Barry noted the great draw of living on the Jersey City waterfront but noted not everyone can afford it. The tower will feature smaller, partially furnished apartments which “use space more efficiently.” But it will have common areas and amenities aimed at fostering a community feel and equating to more living space.

It will include a roof garden, common areas with free WiFi, a cafe in the lobby, a filtered water dispenser in the lobby to cut down on tenant bottled water costs, and other shared amenities.

The facility will “make it easy for a young urban resident to move in without a hassle,’’ Barry said. “I think these buildings (the project will eventually be comprised of three towers) capture the essence of Jersey City’s vibrant economy.’’

The cost of the rentals has not yet been determined, a spokesman said. The tower will be built adjacent to Harborside 5, which is on Hudson Street off Christopher Columbus Drive near Exchange Place. It is to be completed in 2016.

The developers received $33 million in tax credits from the state Economic Development Authority in October for the first tower.

Jersey City Mayor Steven Fulop spoke at yesterday’s event that was attended by more than 100 people and credited the administration of former Mayor Jerramiah T. Healy for handling the preliminary phases of the project. Fulop said the project speaks to the vibrancy of the city and thriving development seen in it.

“Not only will this be the tallest residential building in the state, the project also incorporates sustainability elements and develops a community-style concept through public spaces,’’ said Fulop. “We are pleased to be breaking ground on this exciting project today.’’

Star-Ledger staff writer Tom De Poto contributed to this report


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